September 28-30, 2015

Warsaw, Poland

Dojo: UXtheGame

by Agnieszka Mozol

Workshop will be divided into three turns. Each turn begins with a short scavenger hunt for the main task and materials needed to define the problem. It is followed by hands-on sessions during which Participants work within the group to solve each task with time limit. After the time ends work of each group is presented end evaluated and the score for the round is given to each group. After the score is given next turn starts. Each turn is designed to build on the previous sessions and cultivates increasing knowledge and skills. Our goal with "UXtheGame" is to provide a great user experience while touching on most critical moments in a product lifecycle.

Dojo: Basic coaching toolkit for Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches

by Andy Brandt

Effective Scrum Master or Agile Coach must have the ability to switch between different roles and stances being a teacher, a facilitator, a coach or a mentor depending on circumstances. Coaching is the least understood and most difficult of them, yet also the most powerful. While Agile Coaching is very different from life coaching and other similar disciplines it is nevertheless first and foremost about people. Some techniques and approaches used in coaching and professional mentoring are very useful, others should be used with great care. As a Scrum Master or Agile Coach you should know at least some basics and be able to consciously apply those techniques in your work.

In this workshop we will help you become a better Scrum Master or Agile Coach by giving you a solid foundation of good coaching practices with a little bit of necessary theory.

During this workshop participants will learn:
- how to use the power of silence?
- what are associations and dissociation and how to use them?
- how to set goals for a conversation?
- how to assist people as they look for solutions by helping them switch to different perspectives?
- how to roll it into a complete coaching conversation?
- how to use it in your work without having to formally set up coaching sessions?

All the techniques will be briefly introduced and demonstrated, then participants will have the chance to use them in a safe, controlled environment and get feedback for future improvement. This will help you use those techniques in your work right after the workshop.

This workshop will be moderated by a unique team of two Scrum.org’s PSTs: Andy Brandt and Krystian Kaczor (who is also an ICF certified coach using Solution Focused Approach).

Dojo: Scrum or not-Scrum - Product Vision is a communication tool.

by Anna Zarudzka

A guy comes to a doctor and says he needs a steroid inhaler for his bronchitis. The doctor asks 'Are you in any pain?' 'No, not really. A bit of pain in my leg, but I need the medicine for my bronchitis.'
'Any cough?' 'No.'
'Chest pain?' 'Yes, a little bit, I've already said I had bronchitis.'
'And why the leg pain? Did you injure it?'
'No, that doesn't matter. I stumbled and fell over, it's not a concern. There was some swelling and I grazed my chest at the same time.' 'So I understand that you have bruised your ribs? You don't need a steroid inhaler, just an ointment and some patience.'
Scrum or not-Scrum - patient's diagnosis is wrong or incomplete by default.
Scrum or not-Scrum - stakeholders forget who the product is for.
Scrum or not-Scrum - the most important this is: What for and Who for you are creating.
Scrum or not-Scrum - it's hard to remember it every day, the team tends to forget.
I will tell you - and teach you - how we bring out the customers all information we use to create the solutions they really need. It's not a single known method, and it's a little bit of each of them - it's my own mix of ideas and techniques, developed through practice of working with the customers. I will show you how to avoid building a product for stakeholders - even Scrum looks awesome, all holds up in the iterations, but still not for the users.
Beta tests stage is too late. From the very first day, your each move should be based on a clear, solid vision of the product and the business objectives. How to bring it out?

Dojo: Go Out of The Building - how to interview customers and gather feedback

by Bartek Janowicz

For many of us a building/coding/creating solution is the most interesting part of innovation process. But in startup world less than 10% of ideas success after confrontation with real customers. In corporate world maybe more ideas has a chance to be implemented and validated on market.

This workshop will give you inspiration and knowledge how to talk with customers on early stage of you business idea, before you start/code/develop anything. Because knowing customer and their problems/needs is a half of success.
During this session you will learn:
- how to prepare to interview with customer
- how to ask an appropriate questions and listen to learn
- how to gather data and insights to next iteration & feedback loop
- why it's better to do live interview with customer first and online questionnaire after, not otherwise
So iterate in close interaction with customers using their feedback and learn on gathering a real data and insight.
Do your Customer Discovery lessons first and "Go Out of The Building" to meet real customers, because there are no facts in your building!

Dojo: Speaking is overrated. Some examples of how to show it.

by Beata Nowakowska

Lecturing is overrated. We prefer to experience new things than just listen about them. Passive listening wont ever engage you enough to stand up and change the world.
Then how can we make others understand Scrum? Easily by showing it's effectiveness!

Over the course of this workshop I will share with you some of the exercises I use to explain such topics as self-organization, planning and estimating, roles and their responsibilities.

Dojo: Management 3.0 Workout - Games, Tools & Practices to Engage People, Improve Work, and Delight Clients

by Daniel Skowroński

When an organization’s culture is bad, don’t just blame the managers. Management of an organization is everyone’s responsibility. Better management means engaging people, improving the whole system, and increasing value for clients. For most people, however, these principles are not enough. They need concrete practices, or in other words, regular workout exercises.

During 3h of workshop we will discuss what is Management 3.0 Workout (how different it is comparing to standard Management 3.0), discuss two or three important topics that it covers also enjoying games and practices worth applying in your organization.

So, if you want your workplace to be happy and healthy, what is holding you?

Attend the Management 3.0 Workout 3h workshop facilitated by agile coach Daniel Skowroński, MGT 3.0 certified trainer.

More info in polish http://management30.pl

Dojo: Lean UX: Cross-functional product design

by Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

In this hands-on practical workshop you will learn and practice Lean UX techniques. It's time go get creative and to get out to test your ideas! Lean UX combines agile collaboration, lean startup principles and design thinking and applies this all to the "upstream" product discovery work. You will learn how to drive your product design using hypothesis statements (instead of the traditional "requirements"), you will learn about MVPs (minimally viable products) and how to put together experiments. The purpose of the workshop is to create a case on your own (co-creation teamwork) and to do hands-on prototyping. Furthermore, we will show you how to integrate Lean UX with the agile development cycle. (this workshop is based upon the materials of the book "Lean UX", by Jeff Gothelf)

Dojo: PO Game - Simulation for Product Owners

by Kamil Surmacz

It is extremely difficult to give a substitute of experience, that comes with real work, during teaching of a agile product management methodologies. However, it is indispensable and represent an important part on a learning stage. Therefore, we decided to create an opportunity to even partially touch a day to day reality of the Product Owner work through a simulation.
During the preparation stage of the game participants would create a stakeholders group, which goal will be creating a proposed software product or service in an attempt to earn a profit from it. The game will begin with a creation of the product backlog and formation of the development team. During the exercise a Product Owner will be managing priorities, interact with other members of his group and take decisions about staffing, overtimes, training and ways to deal with the technology debt. This game includes also a mechanisms to simulate the unpredictability that characterize people, requirements and the complexity of IT technologies. As a backbone of this game we will use the Scrum framework.

Dojo: Positive Communication

by Kate Terlecka

How to maintain a high level of engagement and good vibes in your team? Especially with so many POLISH complainers around? Many have wondered.

We will debate some answers. Let's jump on hot topics: positive messages, maintaining good ratio of positives and negatives, language that pushes us towards goals and a hot thing on many mouths - Non-Violent Communication.

Dojo: Basic coaching toolkit for Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches

by Krystian Kaczor

Effective Scrum Master or Agile Coach must have the ability to switch between different roles and stances being a teacher, a facilitator, a coach or a mentor depending on circumstances. Coaching is the least understood and most difficult of them, yet also the most powerful. While Agile Coaching is very different from life coaching and other similar disciplines it is nevertheless first and foremost about people. Some techniques and approaches used in coaching and professional mentoring are very useful, others should be used with great care. As a Scrum Master or Agile Coach you should know at least some basics and be able to consciously apply those techniques in your work.

In this workshop we will help you become a better Scrum Master or Agile Coach by giving you a solid foundation of good coaching practices with a little bit of necessary theory.

During this workshop participants will learn:
- how to use the power of silence?
- what are associations and dissociation and how to use them?
- how to set goals for a conversation?
- how to assist people as they look for solutions by helping them switch to different perspectives?
- how to roll it into a complete coaching conversation?
- how to use it in your work without having to formally set up coaching sessions?

All the techniques will be briefly introduced and demonstrated, then participants will have the chance to use them in a safe, controlled environment and get feedback for future improvement. This will help you use those techniques in your work right after the workshop.

This workshop will be moderated by a unique team of two Scrum.org’s PSTs: Andy Brandt and Krystian Kaczor (who is also an ICF certified coach using Solution Focused Approach).

Dojo: UXtheGame

by Krystian Mrozek

Workshop will be divided into three turns. Each turn begins with a short scavenger hunt for the main task and materials needed to define the problem. It is followed by hands-on sessions during which Participants work within the group to solve each task with time limit. After the time ends work of each group is presented end evaluated and the score for the round is given to each group. After the score is given next turn starts. Each turn is designed to build on the previous sessions and cultivates increasing knowledge and skills. Our goal with "UXtheGame" is to provide a great user experience while touching on most critical moments in a product lifecycle.

Dojo: PO Game - Simulation for Product Owners

by Krzysiek Kosacki

It is extremely difficult to give a substitute of experience, that comes with real work, during teaching of a agile product management methodologies. However, it is indispensable and represent an important part on a learning stage. Therefore, we decided to create an opportunity to even partially touch a day to day reality of the Product Owner work through a simulation.
During the preparation stage of the game participants would create a stakeholders group, which goal will be creating a proposed software product or service in an attempt to earn a profit from it. The game will begin with a creation of the product backlog and formation of the development team. During the exercise a Product Owner will be managing priorities, interact with other members of his group and take decisions about staffing, overtimes, training and ways to deal with the technology debt. This game includes also a mechanisms to simulate the unpredictability that characterize people, requirements and the complexity of IT technologies. As a backbone of this game we will use the Scrum framework.

Dojo: Refine your backlog first!

by Łukasz Krupa

It is said that backlog refinement (backlog grooming) is ongoing process. For instance, in Scrum Framework there is no formal event to cover the need of working with the product backlog.
Usually team decides on his own how and when refinement is done and chooses the best way of doing it.
However, for couple of years I have been observing agile teams struggling with product backlog refinement. As a consequence:
- Planning sessions may seem to be backlog refinement sessions.
- A team could feel overwhelmed with the lack of proper preparation.
- The quality of the increment delivered at the end of iteration could be unsatisfactory.

In order to provide valuable products to the customers, the product backlog refinement process is one of the key points. Let's make sure we do it right.

In this workshop we will:
- learn what should we do to refine product backlog items,
- discuss when should the product backlog refinement take place and who should attend,
- master how to grasp business value out of the requirements,
- elaborate examplary structure of product backlog refinement session.

Dojo: Business Needs Discovering Game

by Michał Bartyzel

One of key process patterns defined by Specification By Example is 'Derive scope from goals'. But the goals come form business needs located in business minds.

Attending the workshop you will learn how to discover business needs during conversation with business people.

Key learning outcomes:

* What is a 'business need' and types of it?
* Set of smart questions to discover and clarify business needs
* How to use Conversation Patterns to deal with conversation deadlock?
* How to suggest business people choosing your own solution of an issue?

Dojo: Evo Planning to produce even more in shorter time

by Niels Malotaux

Evolutionary Delivery (Evo) is an Agile approach allowing teams to deliver more business value in shorter time, as has been shown in numerous environments like projects for space (40 man-year saved), building automation, and banking, in waterfall projects as well as Agile/Scrum teams.
Originally, Evo was focused on how to define the ‘real’ requirements for what we’re supposed to do, how to prioritize the order of value delivery, and actively learn from feedback. In order to operationalize this further, Niels added Evo Planning, which is aimed to even further improve both successful as well as timely delivery, continuously increasing the effectiveness, the efficiency, and the predictability of what we do. Evo is actually the mother of all Agile, but most Agile approaches didn’t take the full breath and hence lack some of the benefits.
We’ll introduce the basic Evo techniques: Real Requirements, TaskCycles to increase efficiency, DeliveryCycles to increase effectiveness, and TimeLine for oversight and predictability. TimeLine exposes the real status of the work, and when we discover early that we will be late, we effectively deal with it.
The content is similar to the session “Evo Planning to produce even more in shorter time”, but now we have time to do some exercises. You’ll run a project to deliver Quality on Time, and find out your baseline of estimation, defect delivery, design wit, and requirements recognition. If you bring a list of the most important things you have to work on in the next couple of weeks, you’ll even be able to experience yourself why Evo Planning makes you delivering better results in shorter time.
If you come as a team, you can experience how Evo Planning can make you work more effective and efficient as a team.
Managers can learn what they can and should expect from their development teams.
If you think you are already very effective and efficient, please come and see for yourself what others experienced when they thought the same.
Preparation:
Please read and prepare carefully. The better you prepare, the more you will learn.
Write down:
- The top-3 stakeholders of your work or project (Who is waiting for it?)
- The top-3 real requirements for your work or project (What are they waiting for?)
- How much value improvement the stakeholders expect (3 or 7?)
- Any deadlines (No deadlines: it will take longer)
- What you and your team should and can have achieved in the coming 10 weeks (Will you succeed? - Failure is not an option!)
- What you and your team think they should and can do the coming week in order to achieve what you’re supposed to achieve (Make sure not to plan what you shouldn’t or cannot do - At the end of the week everything you planned will be done)
- What value you will have delivered by the end of the week and how to prove it
- Any issues you expect with the above or otherwise with your work or project
If you find it difficult to write these things down, don’t worry, that’s why we run this workshop. If you come out of the workshop with any change in what you wrote down, this will allow you to work more on more important things, and less on less important things. Better focus on what really is important immediately saves time. The time you spent coming to this conference can be quickly regained by applying the techniques you can learn in this workshop. This may convince your boss to allow you to attend the conference and this workshop. Perhaps he’ll even come with you.

Dojo: Quantifying Cost of Delay: Why is it the “one thing” to quantify? How do I do it?

by Özlem Yüce

Don Reinertsen says that if you only quantify one thing, quantify the Cost of Delay. As we’ve talked about before, quantifying Cost of Delay not only helps improve prioritisation, it also help with making trade-off decisions, creates a sense of urgency, and changes the focus of the conversation. Maybe this has got you interested in experimenting with it, but you’re not sure how to get started? If so, this workshop is specifically for you!

When people hear about Cost of Delay they sometimes doubt whether their organisation is ready for it. They say things like, “We don’t have the maturity for it”, or “We couldn’t do that because our stakeholders wouldn’t support it”. We’ve heard people say this too. And yet, in hindsight, people find it much easier than they thought! We will show you how to get started with using Cost of Delay, despite these doubts.

Building blocks
The first essential building block is to understand the value. To help structure the conversation we will use a simple economic framework to surface the assumptions and drive to the economic impacts. The second essential building block is to understand the urgency. For this, we will look at different urgency curves to help us understand how value is likely to decay over time. Combining these two gives us the Cost of Delay helping us to question and better understand what our gut tells us about value and urgency.

Practice makes perfect!
To get going, we will start by looking at some simplified scenarios that help you put what you’ve learned about Cost of Delay into practice. You’ll work at your own pace through some simple exercises that test different aspects of your understanding. To really embed it, once you’re done you’ll get a chance to help others around you – you become the teacher. We will then quickly reflect on what we’ve learned so far.

Then, we’re all going to work on quickly estimating the Cost of Delay for a real life example for a real company. You’ll do this in pairs making assumptions you need to get to a cost of delay for the feature in dollars per week. To help us learn about what the key assumptions were we will compare results across the group to help us understand what the value might be and the areas of greatest uncertainty.

To wrap up we’re going to ask you to do a mini-retrospective about what you’ve learned and what your puzzles are. If we have any time left, we’re happy to help you have a go with a feature or project you are working with.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session you should be able to go back to your organisation armed with a better understanding of what Cost of Delay is, why it’s useful and be confident enough to apply it.

Learn about an economic framework for estimating value
Learn about the most common urgency profiles we see
Do some exercises to work out the Cost of Delay for a set of scenarios
Get some practice with helping others to calculate the Cost of Delay
Learn about the assumptions we often need to make in order to calculate Cost of Delay.
Get to a Cost of Delay figure (in dollars per week) for a real situation, compare and contrast with others.
Be able to calculate the Cost of Delay for your own Project or Feature.

Dojo: Before the First Sprint

by Paweł Feliński

There's a lot to do before the first sprint. Not necessarily, what you were told at school.
Setting up an environment during ""sprint 0""? - Nah, that's the wrong way.
Waiting for the customer to deliver specification? Nope, unless you are interested in waterfall.
Writing a detailed project plan? Good luck.

Instead of falling into the trap of analysis phase, the period between the customer's call and the first sprint is the time when you, your customer and your team work together in order to understand the future product, so that its vision and backlog are ready for the first Sprint Planning.

During the workshop you will experience the entire way from the moment the customer calls you with a query till the beginning of the first iteration. We will explore:
- a product vision statement using Product Canvas,
- a brainstorm on user types with a technique of Personas,
- an initial Product Backlog creation with User Stories Mapping,
- an estimating session using the Elephant Sizing and variants of the Definition of Done,
- final calculations as an input to the offering.

Who should attend the session?
The workshop is dedicated especially to Product Owners, Scrum Masters, project managers, owners and Development Teams engaged in customer collaboration, however everybody interested in the topic is warmly welcome. Basic knowledge of Agile is a must.

Dojo: Lean Canvas - Evaluate Your Next Business Idea

by Paweł Wrzeszcz

Lean Canvas is a business plan on 1 A4 page. It goes beyond “what it’s going to do” to “what are the problems to solve”, “what makes us different”, “who will pay” and “how are we going to reach them?”.

More about Lean Canvas: http://practicetrumpstheory.com/businessmodelcanvas/

During the workshop we will create Lean Canvases for your ideas (You may or you may not come up with a business idea - it’s up to you. We’ll choose some of the ideas and work in groups) and have a lot of fun discovering various perspectives of your business.

Dojo: Unit, Flow - That Is Lean Thinking

by Piotr Jozwiak

This workshop gives an opportunity to apply Lean thinking and experience it's benefits in safe, dry environment with use of simple paper-folding game. Learn what flow efficiency is, verify importance of focus on a unit, understand where secondary needs come from and observe boost in quality and profit without even thinking about them.

"Experiential Learning Model" by David Kolb is used: workshop starts with an exercise of paper-boat folding in teams, participants are free to choose and use any of their usual approach to production and product delivery. Summary of results is made and discussed, then an explanation of flow efficiency and Lean is given. A second sessions of paper-boat folding follows, for participants to test Lean: to focus on a unit flow, observe results, reflect, discuss - and improve in third exercise after that. Examples of possible Lean applications in participants environments conclude the workshop.

Prerequisite Knowledge:
• none

Learning Outcomes:
• A quick, practical introduction to Lean.
• Experience how a change in thinking improves production revenue and product delivery times along with product quality, waste reduction and customer satisfaction.

Workshop History:
Such workshops where given to 20+ teams (120+ people) as a quick, introductory training to Lean.

Dojo: Buisiness Needs Discovering Game

by Radek Lont

One of key process patterns defined by Specification By Example is 'Derive scope from goals'. But the goals come form business needs located in business minds.

Attending the workshop you will learn how to discover business needs during conversation with business people.

Key learning outcomes:

* What is a 'business need' and types of it?
* Set of smart questions to discover and clarify business needs
* How to use Conversation Patterns to deal with conversation deadlock?
* How to suggest business people choosing your own solution of an issue?


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